Hyacinth’s Journey Home: Surviving Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse, and Homelessness

project home

Excerpts from an Interview with Hyacinth:

 

At first when I heard voices I was like, “Wow, God’s talking to me.” Voices are coming out of the television. My voices were telling me that my parents were trying to hold me back, to get me into trouble, to kill me actually.

 

So, I just got in my car and just drove into the wild blue yonder.

I first met Hyacinth King seven years ago, when I was working on OC87: The Obsessive-Compulsive, Major Depression, Bipolar, Asperger’s Movie. I was co-directing the film with Scott Johnston and Bud Clayman (Bud is the founder of this website and the subject of the film).

Bud and his mother were supporters of Project HOME, an inspiring and super successful non-profit organization located in Philadelphia. Project HOME empowers people to break the cycle of poverty and homelessness through affordable housing, employment, health care, and education. Since 1989, Project HOME has developed nationally recognized programs that have proven that homelessness can be solved.

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Life at the Intersection of Race, Gender, and Mental Health

I’m not in pain anymore. I’m not upset anymore. I’m a very happy, unique kind of person. And it feels good.   –Monica Tiffany Rose in the video A Journey Within     Gender is the complex interrelationship between an individual’s sex (gender biology), one’s internal sense of self as male, female, both or neither (gender identity) as well as one’s outward presentations and behaviors (gender expression) related to that perception, including their gender role. Together, the intersection of these three dimensions produces one’s authentic sense of gender, both in how people experience their own gender as well as how others perceive it. DEFINITION FROM GENDER SPECTRUM’S WEBSITE   Intersctionality is the interconnected nature of social categorizations such as race, class, and gender as they apply to a given individual or group, regarded as creating overlapping and interdependent systems of discrimination or disadvantage: through an awareness of intersectionality, we can better acknowledge and ground the differences among us. DEFINITION FROM OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY     Editor’s note: In sometimes strategic, sometimes mysterious ways, films grow legs and walk around the world. They find audiences that are in need of experiencing them. In today’s digital age with so many distribution options, chances are increased that someone can randomly chance upon a film that has meaning for their life. Yet it is always a pleasure, and an honor, when a film is selected to be shared with a group of people who are hungry for the story it tells. Such is the story of A Journey Within, a short OC87 Recovery Diaries film about Monica, a young woman who shared her story of... read more

Getting Help With Medication And Therapy

Editor’s note from Glenn Holsten: A few months ago, Lauren Dicair submitted an essay about her life to OC87 Recovery Diaries. I was stunned by her story — it contained tremendously sad details of a traumatic childhood that was followed by years of wrestling with mental health issues.  I was also impressed by her resilience — the writer who had weathered so many emotional and physical storms was able to tell her story with quiet determination and thoughtful reflection. When Lauren and I first spoke by phone, she informed me that the essay was a condensed version of stories from her memoir, which she is currently writing.  She spoke beautifully her reasons for — and challenges of — writing a memoir. I was struck by her resolve to discover meaning in her life, to heal herself, and to help others. By sharing her story, she wants to prevent another person from experiencing the isolation and pain that marked her childhood. The video interview excerpts that accompany this post include much of what was discussed in that phone conversation, in hopes of providing a window into Lauren’s writing process, and an effort to share the issues and questions that someone writing a memoir must address when undertaking such an effort. We’ve decided to publish the story in three parts — which gives Lauren the space to include important details about each chapter of her life. In Chapter One, Lauren takes us from infancy and a very painful childhood through her high school years. In Chapter Two, Lauren recounts what may be described as her “roaring 20s” – a tumultuous time... read more

Dealing With Depression And Anxiety in College

Editor’s note from Glenn Holsten: A few months ago, Lauren Dicair submitted an essay about her life to OC87 Recovery Diaries. I was stunned by her story — it contained tremendously sad details of a traumatic childhood that was followed by years of wrestling with mental health issues.  I was also impressed by her resilience — the writer who had weathered so many emotional and physical storms was able to tell her story with quiet determination and thoughtful reflection. When Lauren and I first spoke by phone, she informed me that the essay was a condensed version of stories from her memoir, which she is currently writing.  She spoke beautifully her reasons for — and challenges of — writing a memoir. I was struck by her resolve to discover meaning in her life, to heal herself, and to help others. By sharing her story, she wants to prevent another person from experiencing the isolation and pain that marked her childhood. The video interview excerpts that accompany this post include much of what was discussed in that phone conversation, in hopes of providing a window into Lauren’s writing process, and an effort to share the issues and questions that someone writing a memoir must address when undertaking such an effort. We’ve decided to publish the story in three parts — which gives Lauren the space to include important details about each chapter of her life. Part one is about her childhood, part two takes us from her college years through young adulthood, and part three brings us to the present day, to a better place and time in Lauren’s life.... read more

Born into Addiction and Withdrawal

  Editor’s note from Glenn Holsten: A few months ago, Lauren Dicair submitted an essay about her life to OC87 Recovery Diaries. I was stunned by her story — it contained tremendously sad details of a traumatic childhood that was followed by years of wrestling with mental health issues.  I was also impressed by her resilience — the writer who had weathered so many emotional and physical storms was able to tell her story with quiet determination and thoughtful reflection. When Lauren and I first spoke by phone, she informed me that the essay was a condensed version of stories from her memoir, which she is currently writing.  She spoke beautifully her reasons for — and challenges of — writing a memoir. I was struck by her resolve to discover meaning in her life, to heal herself, and to help others. By sharing her story, she wants to prevent another person from experiencing the isolation and pain that marked her childhood. The video interview excerpts that accompany this post include much of what was discussed in that phone conversation, in hopes of providing a window into Lauren’s writing process, and an effort to share the issues and questions that someone writing a memoir must address when undertaking such an effort. We’ve decided to publish the story in three parts — which gives Lauren the space to include important details about each chapter of her life. Part one is about her childhood, part two takes us from her college years through young adulthood, and part three brings us to the present day, to a better place and time in Lauren’s... read more

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